I haven’t made a post here for quite some time since I have been very busy with other stuff. To make up for it, I have listed here some of the old posts that might be helpful should you be planning your own Sagada trip.

Most of our just quick posts as I don’t write exhaustive travel tips or articles.

Sagada Trip Budget
Drive Your Own Car to Sagada… But Be Safe
Sagada’s Coldest
Of Rain and Landslides
Passing By the Banaue Rice Terraces
Is Sagada A Sleepy Town?
Sagada Tip: Bring a Portable Heater
Sagada At Peak Season: Avoid If You Can
Sagada in the Rain? Yes, please!
A Friendly Sagada Reminder

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Sagada Video

by MJ

Play this video to see a short photo video of my Sagada trips.  :)

 

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Bomod-ok Falls

Bomod-ok Falls

Have you ever heard of Sagada? It’s a very peaceful village located in the mountains of northern Philippines. For the past decade, people from different countries have visited it to experience the local culture and the wonderful sites of nature.

The village of Sagada is in the Mountain Province in Luzon, the largest island in the country. Because of its elevation it generally has cold weather throughout much of the year as compared to the lowlands. The coldest are from the months of November to February and as such has become a favorite summer destination.

Sagada is indeed one of the most beautiful places in the Philippines if you want to commune with nature. You have the mountains around you, the clean and cold air to breathe, and the lush foliage to remind you of how good Mother Earth really is. There are many things that you can see and do in this fabled village, some of these are:

1. Sumaguing and Lumiang Caves

These are big interconnected caves that offer a wonderful spelunking experience for those who want to get their hands dirty with a caving adventure. Die hard and professional spelunkers may find this easy to their skills, that is why it is more frequented by novice spelunkers. As a best practice, always get the services of a guide.

2. Bomod-ok and Bokong Falls

These are some of beautiful waterfalls in the Philippines. The Bomod-ok is the tallest of the two and is often refered to by tourists as the Big Falls. Bokong Falls, on the other hand, is much smaller and therefore is usually caled the Small Falls. You will have to walk through the rice terraces to reach both falls.

3. Food trip

A Sagada trip is never complete without trying the local food fare. There are many restaurants there, some owned and managed by foreigners who have called Sagada their home. Aside from the local cuisine, you can also get American, British, and French cuisine from some of the restaurants. You should also try the Sagada oranges.

4. Hiking and nature tripping

Since Sagada is amongst mountains, there are many beautiful hiking trails. While you can go on your own, it is always advisable to get a guide just so you do not get lost. Aside from hiking you can also go camping. Mount Ampucao is a great place for these activities.

These are just some of the things that you can see and do in Sagada. There are certainly more to experience, and what you have read here are just for whetting your traveling appetite. When you get there, always visit first the tourist information center. Inquire about their guide services and if there are any restrictions with the places you would want to visit.

So the next time you are planning a major vacation, why not consider a Sagada trip which is guaranteed to be a cultural experience and adventure like no other. From hiking to mountain climbing, from mingling with the local folks to eating good food, Sagada is just the place you would want to be.

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Here’s a news story from the Manila Bulletin listing 21 Cordillera towns under the poll watchlist. Sagada is under category 2 because of some influence of rebel forces in some parts of the area.

http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/249753/21-cordillera-towns-poll-watchlist

It just came as a surprise to me because I didn’t know there were rebel groups near the area. In fact, I’ve always felt safe whenever I traveled to Sagada.

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Sagada Caves: Inside the Sumaguing Cave Part 3

January 6, 2010

At the lower part of the Sumaguing Cave are water basins that are very cold and sparkling clear. You will love wading through the shallow water as the cold water tingles your feet. The water is too clean that many times I was tempted to take a drink.

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Sagada Caves: Inside the Sumaguing Cave Part 2

July 31, 2009

The water is very, very chilly! And if you think that rock’s surface look slippery, then you’re wrong. Go barefoot and you can feel the soles of your feet clinging to the rock.

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Inside the Sumaguing Cave Series

July 12, 2009

One of the most popular destinations in Sagada is the Sumaguing cave. A lot have already been written about the beauty of this natural wonder so I will just post a series of photos. Let’s start this series with this first Sumaguing photo…

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The Sagada Inquiries Have Stopped

April 12, 2009

I have just removed my sticky post about inviting people to email me regarding their Sagada inquiries. I made that post in January and since then I literally received dozens of emails asking various Sagada questions. The most common were: how much is the budget, how to get there, the best inns to stay, sights […]

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A Room at St. Joseph’s Inn

March 22, 2009

I stayed once at St. Joseph back in 2007 and I enjoyed it there completely. As it’s located on a hill, when you step outside of the inn, you will get a nice view of the town of Sagada including the mountains surrounding it. Although you can’t tell by the picture, when I stayed there […]

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Sagada Trip Budget

February 15, 2009

For the past couple of days, three people emailed me asking how much should their budget be if they are going for a two-day Sagada trip. I said P4,000 should be more than enough. I once survived on a P2,500 budget but that was because I traveled alone and I didn’t hire any guides when […]

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